Goal Visualization and How to Practice It for Best Results

illustration of a man's head surrounded by numbers

Sometimes, when we want to achieve something, it helps to visualize the desired result. You might find this strange, but this technique definitely has its benefits. If we’re being completely honest, we sometimes tend to get stuck after we’ve established our goals. One of the reasons why we don’t know how to proceed next is that there isn’t enough to motivate us into thinking that this goal is worth fighting for. Now, what better way to motivate yourself than to visualize how achieving said goal might look like? Today, we’re going to talk about goal visualization and the best ways to practice it. Let’s have a look!

How to Practice Goal Visualization

What Is Your Goal?

Of course, the first step towards goal visualization is to choose a goal. Remember to think in realistic terms, such as “I want to learn Spanish”, not “I want to fly to the Moon”. Moreover, it would really help considerably if the goal is something that also gives you a certain amount of pleasure, and not something you’re dreading to do. Now that you’ve thought about a specific goal, try to summarize it on paper. Writing things down can go a long way in ensuring that we stick to them. That is because it isn’t just something in your head anymore, it is now “official”.

What Are the Steps You Have to Take?

Next, take another piece of paper and write down the steps you have to take in order to reach your goal. Sticking with the learning Spanish example, you could write “signing up for an online course” or “buying a Spanish dictionary”. This will help you visualize the entire process better, which will lead to a clearer and more persuasive final picture.

The Process of Goal Visualization

You might be wondering why we’ve been talking about both the goal itself and the process. Well, it is because there are two types of goal visualization that you can try. However, they work best when you use them together.

The first type is outcome visualization, and it entails you imagining that you have reached your goal. In order to properly visualize this, you have to think of as many details as possible. Where were you when this happened? How did it feel to accomplish your goal? Was there somebody else with you? How did the people around you react? These are only a few examples that you should keep in mind.

The second type is called process visualization and it is all about paying attention to every step on the list that you’ve already created. Don’t even think about the final goal. Just take every step as it is and visualize details about it and how it felt when you were over it. Keep a positive attitude – it will motivate you to apply this goal visualization to real life.

While goal visualization should not be relied on to help you solve your problems without working for them, it can be used as an additional support system that might make your goals seem more achievable.

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Author: Amanda Knowles

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